I love a lot about the new iOS. The constant iterative refinements are, to me, welcome in a world where devices are crammed with crap in an effort to stand out from the pack.

That said, the new iOS mapping app has gotten me lost every time I’ve tried to use it. There are plenty of alternatives on the market and continued usage will certainly improve the situation, but I don’t think there’s a more clear measure of the lead Google has on the mapping front then their announcement from this morning.

Apple has a long way to go before they catch up.

Dive into the Great Barrier Reef with the first underwater panoramas in Google Maps.

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Public service announcement for users with these devices.

Reportedly, various versions of the Galaxy devices that use the Touch-Wiz UI can be remote wiped by simply clicking on a malicious weblink. SlashGear has various updates on the situation.

Samsung Galaxy S III remote data-wipe hack reportedly discovered [Updated] – SlashGear.

Macstories has a great list of new stuff you can find in iOS 6.

iOS 6: Tips, Tricks & Hidden Features.

xkcd: Click and Drag

September 19, 2012

Today’s XKCD comic is excellent. Do yourself a favor and check it out on your iPhone/Android/Tablet.

xkcd: Click and Drag.

Review: iPhone 5

September 18, 2012

Jim Dalrymple of Loopinsight.com has the first iPhone 5 review I’ve seen. Normally I see these all around the same time from all the other bloggers, so I can’t help but wonder if he posted it early. Who knows.

Bastard.

Review: iPhone 5.

I’m about to upgrade from the iPhone 4 to the new model, so I’m excited to start using Siri. I know people have mixed luck, but the following list looks really useful, and should actually, well,  work.

What can you say to Siri in iOS 6? | TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog.

FJP has a nice post about what makes Apple different than other companies, while simultaneously opening them up to abuse from bloggers and other tech writers.

A lot of Apple’s success comes from avoiding the temptation of jetpack design. Here’s how they do it:

They pick one feature
… that the market is familiar with
… and they do it better
… then they let you know about it

This is greeted by tech nerds as boring, but to the general public this is exactly what they want. They just want it to work.

FJP – Apple avoids the temptation of jetpack design.